In Between

****1/2

Reviewed by: Jennie Kermode

In Between
"An astonishingly mature feature debut from Hamoud."

Is there anything that makes traditionalist men as angry as women talking openly about their feelings and the things many of them do every day? Earlier this year, Indian film Lipstick Under My Burkha faced a ban (later overturned) for doing just that, and now In Between, a film made in Israel by Palestinian director Maysaloun Hamoud, has attracted an angry response. Hamoud, now the subject of a fatwa, says that she knew it would be controversial but never expected such a strong reaction.

"Remember where we are living," one of the film's heroines is told. This is not the West; she must, she is told, adjust her expectations as a result, and not insist so loudly on living life on her own terms. But what does being a rebel mean in this context? What makes Hamoud's film so potent is that it doesn't just show the impact of sexist tradition on women who want to party, drink alcohol and wear skinny jeans. It also shows what it can do to women who themselves adhere to old fashioned values.

Copy picture

Nour (Shaden Kanboura) is a shy, sweet-natured hijabi student who seems distinctly out of place when she moves into the flat shared by Leila (Mouna Hawa) and Salma (Sana Jammelieh), but although their lives are very different from hers - Leila has a Jewish boyfriend, Salma is a lesbian, and both conduct their social lives much as they might do in London or Berlin - she's drawn to their friendliness, and a strong bond forms between them. A mutual love of good food seals the deal. The problem is that Nour's fiancé doesn't like these new influences in her life. As his controlling behaviour escalates, she becomes increasingly aware that she has to make a change in her life - and find a way to do it that will let her remain true to herself.

With Leila and Salma facing problems of their own, Hamoud is able to explore not just the challenges in women's lives but the solidarity that makes it possible to cope, even if that doesn't always mean that things work out the way they want. She does so with a deft touch in a film that never feels heavy-handed, and the performances she coaxes from her leads are compelling. Kanboura, in particular, stands out for the depth she gives to her character, making her much more than just a victim, though at times her suffering is heartbreaking to watch.

A complicated ensemble piece with a lot going on, In Between is an astonishingly mature feature debut from Hamoud, who balances themes and events with great skill. Importantly, the women at the centre of her story never really seem remote from the Palestinian Israeli society around them, but emerge from it as part of an organic whole. Cultural connections go much deeper than the value system built around restricting their behaviour. There are echoes of 2012's Out In The Dark in the visible disconnection between how cinemagoers expect to see Palestinians represented and what is, essentially, real life.

This is a gem of a film that is deserving of international attention in its own right, and not just because of the hatred it has attracted. It doesn't just raise women's voices; it tells a very human story about women who are complex and believable and intriguing.

Reviewed on: 17 Sep 2017
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Three Palestinian women share a flat in Tel Aviv.

Director: Maysaloun Hamoud

Writer: Maysaloun Hamoud

Starring: Mouna Hawa, Sana Jammelieh, Shaden Kanboura, Mahmud Shalaby, Henry Andrawes

Year: 2016

Runtime: 103 minutes

Country: Israel, France

Festivals:

SSFF 2016
Glasgow 2017

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