Adam And Dog

***1/2

Reviewed by: Jennie Kermode

Adam And Dog
"It's easy to love this animated hound, with his bouncing and his cheerful barking and his wide-eyed affectionate glances."

It begins with Dog. Running, Exploring. Following trails. Meeting a variety of other creatures but none, until Adam, who really want to play. Together they invent games discovered a million times since by small boys and puppies. They become best friends. Then Adam discovers Eve. Suddenly he is nowhere to be found. Doesn't he know that Dog will always be true?

It's a gentle, indulgent take on the Genesis story. If there has been a Lilith, she's long gone. We never see the forbidden fruit, for all that we see its effects. Here, these provide a metaphor for smething else - for the uncomfortable wisdom that comes with adulthood, with the straining of a bond that seemed unbreakable. It's easy to love this animated hound, with his bouncing and his cheerful barking and his wide-eyed affectionate glances. It's easy to feel his pain and confusion as he wanders alone on the mountainside. Betrayal of a friendship like this seems a sin of the first order. But there is a redemptive power to Dog's love, and a willingness to follow his master anywhere.

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There isn't much to this story and no attempt is made to deal with the difficult issues it raises, but if we accept that we are approaching it from Dog's perspective then that seems entirely fair. Lee's landscapes are beautiful, simple yet evocative. Between this and his mastery of emotional cues (we can forgive the slightly clich├ęd music), he has created a charming little tale with something to say about love.

Reviewed on: 14 Feb 2013
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Adam And Dog packshot
In the garden of Eden, Man meets his best friend.

Director: Minkyu Lee

Writer: Minkyu Lee

Year: 2011

Runtime: 15 minutes

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