Tribeca Film Festival announces main slate

Phil Morrison, Neil LaBute and Clark Gregg films among world premieres.

by Amber Wilkinson

The Tribeca Film Festival has announced the main slate for its 12th edition.

The New York festival will open on April 17 with the world premiere of Mistaken For Strangers, which follows The National on tour. There will be a special performance by the band following the screening.

Twelve narrative and 12 documentary features will compete for a total of $180,000 (£119,000) in prize money.

Artistic director Frederic Boyer said: "Our competition selections embody the quality and diversity of contemporary cinema from across the globe. The cinematic proficiency that harnesses this lineup is remarkable and we’re looking forward to sharing these new perspectives, powerful performances, and multifaceted stories.”

Among the films making their debut are Almost Christmas - director Phil Morrison's long-awaited follow up to indie favourite Junebug - and Trust Me, the latest from Avengers actor and Choke director Clark Gregg. The festival will also host the world premiere of Neil LaBute's drama Some Velvet Morning, starring Stanley Tucci and Alice Eve, and Josh Fox's fracking documentary follow-up Gasland II.

Other documentaries to look out for are Whoopi Goldberg's directorial feature debut I Got Somethin' To Tell You, about ground-breaking comic Moms Mabley and Chiemi Karasawa's Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me.

The UK and Ireland are also making their presence felt, with Scottish fly-fishing documentary Kiss The Water and Garage director Lenny Abrahamson's drama What Richard Did included in the Viewpoints strand. Inside Out: The People's Art Project, the latest film from British director Alastair Siddons (Turn It Loose), will also receive its world premiere, while Neil Jordan (Interview With The Vampire) returns to blood-sucking themes in Byzantium.

The festival has reverted its Cinemania section back to the Midnight label, although the films there continue to be the standard mix of horror and sci-fi. Britflick The Machine, by Caradog W James, about a cyborg that could be used for good or evil, will have its world premiere in the section.

The festival has introduced a new transmedia section entitled Storyscapes, which aims to showcase and celebrate cross-genre work. The emphasis is on interactivity, with visitors invited to create animation for Exquisite Forest (more about which, here, while you can see what happens when festivalgoers collaborate with robots to make a documentary with Robots In Residence.

View the line-up by strand: Midnight, Special Screenings, Spotlight, Storyscapes, Viewpoints, World Documentary Feature Competition, World Narrative Competition

And read our previous festivals and see an early taste of this year's, here

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